If ideas are the currency of trade in academia, then conferences are its central banks where researchers, scholars, and other experts can exchange invaluable information on vital topics that shape our world.

Yet all too often, conferences are prohibitively expensive or time-consuming, so the exchange of ideas and research, however great, gets mired in logistics.
UB School of Engineering Associate Dean Dr. Khaled M. Elleithy and Dean/Senior Vice President for Graduate Studies Dr. Tarek Sobh set out to change that. And now, thanks to their success in bringing engineers together, UB has won a Connecticut Quality Improvement Award Competition (CQIA) Gold Innovation Prize.

CQIA awards recognize organizations from manufacturing, service, education, government agencies, and other not-for-profits that develop products, services, or processes that are new to Connecticut and have reached their internal or external markets in the last five years.

Sobh and Elleithy’s contributions were first made ten years ago, when they launched the International Joint Conferences on Computer, Information, Systems Sciences, and Engineering, known as CISSE.

CISSE was the first online engineering conference in the world, and at the time, said Elleithy, “it was an unheard of solution” because anyone with an Internet connection — authors, presenters, and attendees — could participate.

“It attracted people who typically couldn’t go,” Elleithy said. “We have people from the U.S., from Asia, from Africa — from many, many countries.”

Held annually since 2005, CISSE participants have submitted more than 6,000 research papers. Half of those have been published by Springer, the world’s largest engineering publisher, and they are easily accessible here.

More importantly, CISEE events continue to bring together engineering experts from over 80 countries who have much to share with the world, but not always the means to do so.

Media contact: Leslie Geary, (203) 576-4625, lgeary@bridgeport.edu